NCTC’s Newly-Licensed LNAs

Medical+Professions+students+%28from+left%29%3A++Anna+Anderson+%28%2722%29%2C+Amanda+Powers+%28%2721%29%2C+Maren+McGinn+%28%2721%29%2C+Reagan+Richard+%28%2721%29%2C+Bethany+Sanders+%28%2721%29%2C+Sydney+Heth+%28%2721%29%2C+teacher+Shelley+Howrigan%2C+Riley+Gallagher+%28%2721%29%2C+Chelsea+Raymond+%28%2721%29+and+Mackenzie+Moore+%28%2721%29.++Photo+credit%3A++Julie+Faas

Medical Professions students (from left): Anna Anderson (’22), Amanda Powers (’21), Maren McGinn (’21), Reagan Richard (’21), Bethany Sanders (’21), Sydney Heth (’21), teacher Shelley Howrigan, Riley Gallagher (’21), Chelsea Raymond (’21) and Mackenzie Moore (’21). Photo credit: Julie Faas

Rachel Ledoux, Writer

The Coronavirus has caused many classes to switch up their curriculum in order to properly teach their students. Northwest Career and Technical Center’s Medical Professions program is no exception. Because of the class time cuts this year, teachers were unable to fit the LNA (Licensed Nursing Assistant) class into the regular curriculum. In order for students to take it, they would need to complete the entirety of the course outside of school hours during their own time. This would be a challenge for any student but, nevertheless, the NCTC med students stepped up to the challenge.

According to Julie Faas, NCTC’s Medical Professions’ instructor, the LNA class is designed to teach students about basic care for people in need of assistance, such as bathing, dressing, walking and personal hygiene activities, as well as basic healthcare safety, infection control and ethics. Thanks to their actual Medical Professions courses, students were already familiar with the what the class entails before signing up. 

Due to the nature of the LNA course, it is not available to complete online. As such, students had to come into NCTC in person to partake in lessons. For nine weeks, students in the class met from 4-8 pm on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Additionally, some of the current junior students have been meeting on Saturdays. During these few hours a week, students fulfilled their required course hours by participating in lab activities for medical practice. They also completed their clinical hours by working with patients at Northwestern Medical Center. 

Given the hours of the course, it is no surprise why it is so impressive that students stepped up to complete it. In the words of Julie Faas, “Taking the class, in addition to regular school, is a huge commitment.”

Despite the changes in the program and the extra effort required, this year’s class still met the challenge. Eight seniors taking the LNA course passed both the class and state exams with flying colors and are now licensed LNAs.  These seniors are Anna Anderson, Sydney Heth, Maren McGinn, MacKenzie Moore, Amanda Powers, Chelsea Raymond, Reagan Richard and Bethany Sanders. Though the juniors are still in the midst of the course, Faas notes that they are, “doing well with the content.”

In the end, this served as just another example of the ability and perseverance of BFA students, even in the face of strife.